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AuthorTopic: netbsd http, ftp, telnet server on amiga 4000, and about ethernet cards  (Read 2516 times)

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Offline jeffimix

A couple of comments on this thread...

You can buy Miami TCP/IP commercial version if you look on E-bay, people who no longer use it sell it...
 
Also, Elbox's Mediator card will give you cheap acccess to a PC ethernet card

"ACCESSORIES:

It works perfectly with the whole range of network, sound, modem and ISDN cards;
MPEG-2, MP3 decoders and TV cards."
---From Softhut
\\"The only benchmarks that matter is my impression of the system while using the apps I use. Everything else is opinion.\\" - FooGoo
 

  • Guest
Quote

jeffimix wrote:
You can buy Miami TCP/IP commercial version if you look on E-bay, people who no longer use it sell it..
uhmm, what makes you think iam using amiga os ? (in alternative os forum and when the first word in the thread is netbsd)
 

Offline Floid

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smok3 wrote:
uhmm, what makes you think iam using amiga os ? (in alternative os forum and when the first word in the thread is netbsd)
Thread chatter keeps bumping it to the front page, and it seems everyone would rather you stick with the platform.

Or maybe they don't know what NetBSD is!  :shocked:
 

Offline jeffimix

\\"The only benchmarks that matter is my impression of the system while using the apps I use. Everything else is opinion.\\" - FooGoo
 

Offline Ilwrath

Quote
i got some1 offering me a commodore A2065 card, any thoughts on that product?


I can't speak to the quality of the bsd drivers for this card, but I have one in my 4000/060 and it works quite well.  (Much better luck than I had with a 1st gen X-surf!)  Under AmigaOS it's supported in Miami and Genesis.  So hardware wise, at least, your in good shape using the A2065 on a 4000.

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uhmm, what makes you think iam using amiga os ? (in alternative os forum and when the first word in the thread is netbsd)


Yeah, I think they missed that part.  I will ask why you chose netbsd, though...  Amiga OS has most everything you'd need for the project you're working on, and really it's just not an Amiga if it isn't running Amiga OS.  Besides, didn't netbsd recently drop the Amiga m68k line after lack of interest?  
 

Offline Floid

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Ilwrath wrote:
Yeah, I think they missed that part.  I will ask why you chose netbsd, though...  Amiga OS has most everything you'd need for the project you're working on, and really it's just not an Amiga if it isn't running Amiga OS.  Besides, didn't netbsd recently drop the Amiga m68k line after lack of interest?
Well, you can also look at it as a continuation of the AMIX tradition.

NetBSD didn't drop Amiga/68k - that was OpenBSD, and it's an example of the differences between the... three/3.5/four major BSD projects.  NetBSD's focus is on continuing/extending the BSD lineage through wide platform support and an open development model.  (Read: Major alterations to NetBSD must generally survive on/not break the codebases for the platforms supported.)  OpenBSD was forked from NetBSD, and originally chose to preserve the Amiga port, among others- but their focus is on security, and so they've decided to allow the (undermaintained,  for lack of knowledgeable volunteers) Amiga port succumb to its bitrot; they have bigger things to worry about right now.*

FreeBSD, in turn, began sort of oblong to NetBSD,** and has since taken on a sort of staid, RedHat-like role, supporting i386 (and soon a few other platforms) for what's supposed to be stable, 'production' use... and for now, Darwin attracts those who equate free labor for Apple with Saving the Universe.  (Okay, that's a bad joke.  A lot of developers seem to enjoy Darwin because 1. many of its outstanding issues are probably 'easy stuff' long-since tackled in the other systems, and 2. it, and the commercial OS based on it, are 'different' enough that people are finding it a playground for ideas that couldn't be made to fit in the other projects, for whatever reason.  Plus, Apple does pay their developers.)

Perhaps that mudd- er, clears things up?  In any case, NetBSD isn't known for dropping projects; at worst, they end up in perpetual stalled development or limbo - which *does* mean anyone can jump in at a later point and improve them.  (Not that the linked amigappc attempt seems to *have* any code that made it to the tree.)  Even OpenBSD isn't removing the code from their server; they're just not going to roll new developments into it without anyone to catch integration issues and tell them if it works.

--

*Each word is an individual link, there.  Know all the deadly.org ones don't make it obvious.

**Bang forehead on link to continue;  history of the death/rebirth of the original 386BSD project here...and a timeline including BSD and Linux development over here.
 

Offline Ilwrath

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Bang forehead on link to continue;


I found the BSD *nix timeline here quite informative.  (If not confusing -- it looked like a redneck family tree, what with all the inbreeding and such!)  But it does, indeed appear that I had my BSD's confused, and it was OpenBSD that recently announced that it wasn't developing a new Amiga release.  

But I'd still say it's sacrilidge to run an Amiga without AmigaOS nowadays.  ;-)
 

  • Guest
At least OpenBSD did :~/
 

  • Guest
At least OpenBSD did :~/
 

Offline carls

@smok3
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and yes, iam not aware of any cool www server for the amiga os.


Surely you must have heard of gW3S? :-)
gW3S Homepage
Amiga: Too weird to live, too rare to die.
 

Offline Desmon

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        Only one TCP stack (Miami) will handle the DHCP needed by your cable modem, and it can no longer be purchased.

    would that mean i cant use netbsd stack? or can i use amiga&miami prior to booting to netbsd?

Whoever wrote that was a bit confused- under NetBSD, it's all handled by NetBSD, and dhclient is certainly a part of the base install. That would apply to the Amiga side of things, of course... but if you've got a Linksys box or similar, you could always put the machine on the static "DMZ" address behind the NAT.

Sorry about all the nested quotes, but if you read the original question, there's NO mention of NetBSD at all. I simply thought he was trying to run it all under AmigaOS.
Cache Ya,
Craig.


Busy playing with my Trainz and loving it!
 

Offline Floid

Quote
Desmon wrote:
Sorry about all the nested quotes, but if you read the original question, there's NO mention of NetBSD at all. I simply thought he was trying to run it all under AmigaOS.
Yep.  Wasn't trying to be rude, just keeping the facts straight.

gw3s does look quite cool.  Anyone know if it survives on Regina REXX?  Then he could run the same site off AmigaOS *and* NetBSD.  (I've always liked REXX as a concept, but never used it much.  Don't have any clue how socket access works, and/or any ARexx vs. ANSI REXX caveats, if there are any.)
 

Offline carls

@Floid

I tried to rewrite gW3S v1.0 for Linux using Regina, but the only ways I could think of to execute CGI scripts and sending the query strings was a major security hole.

Source code for the Linux version
Amiga: Too weird to live, too rare to die.
 

  • Guest
Quote
carls wrote:
Surely you must have heard of gW3S? :-)
gW3S Homepage
whats interesting is this:
The site www.carls.1av10.nu is running Apache/1.3.26 (Unix) mod_become/1.3 on Linux.
:-D
 

Offline carls

@smok3
Yeah, I know :-)
I don't have a good enough connection at home (only a Cable Modem) to host my own site - plus I don't like the humming sound of a PSU fan when I go to bed (which probably makes me less of a hacker). So I happily run my site at a friend's hobby-hosting project.
Amiga: Too weird to live, too rare to die.