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AuthorTopic: CUSA makes the BBC news site  (Read 9741 times)

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Offline runequester

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Re: CUSA makes the BBC news site
« Reply #90 on: April 08, 2011, 10:29:47 PM »
Quote from: Hammer;630249
C64 was still shipped with Microsoft's user interface solution. Microsoft Windows follows Microsoft Basic's OEM business model.

For user interface, there are plenty of 8bit micro-computers with shipped Microsoft Basic.
Microsoft's early success wasn't fluke.


I think at least one of us is misunderstanding the other :)

What I meant was the 64x does not ship with windows.
 

Offline Hammer

Re: CUSA makes the BBC news site
« Reply #91 on: April 08, 2011, 11:40:59 PM »
Quote from: runequester;630252
I think at least one of us is misunderstanding the other :)

What I meant was the 64x does not ship with windows.

The primary target market is likely to be Windows users with good memory of C64.
AmigaForever 2016 with AmigaOS 4.1 FE, AMIDuOS\'s Android 5.01, MS Windows 10 Pro X64
Samsung ATIV Book 8 880Z5E laptop with touch screen.
CPU: Intel Core i7-3635QM, 2.4Ghz base, 3.4Ghz turbo.
RAM: 16 GB PC3-12800 (DDR3-1600)
GPU: AMD Radeon HD 8870M (OC) 2GB GDDR5 VRAM.
SSD: 512 GB Samsung 840
 

Offline Duce

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Re: CUSA makes the BBC news site
« Reply #92 on: April 09, 2011, 12:44:39 AM »
Windows runs horribly on Atom powered PC's.  I own several of them, and only use them under Linux or a stripped XP booting directly into WB via WinUAE.
 

Offline brenry

Re: CUSA makes the BBC news site
« Reply #93 on: April 09, 2011, 01:16:26 AM »
lol the editorial on PCmag.com website

You Can Keep Your Fake Commodore 64
This resurrected classic computer is nothing but a none-too-cheap imitation of the real thing.
http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2383266,00.asp
 

Offline mdwh2

Re: CUSA makes the BBC news site
« Reply #94 on: April 09, 2011, 02:22:43 AM »
Quote from: Piru;630053
Amen.

It's all those small things indeed, such as:
  • enough grunt to actually be usable, unlike those crappy sub-notebooks with win7 basic. eow...
I'm using a so-called crappy sub-notebook right now, and is fine. I mean what, people once moaned that Windows was bloated, but for OS X, 1GB and a 1.6GHz processor isn't enough? :)

But what's Apple's offering in the same mobile market? An Ipad, which has even less grunt, and has an OS far more basic than Windows 7 starter.

But anyhow, the choice is not "Apple laptops versus cheap netbooks". Other companies have been producing a range of PCs - desktops and laptops - long before Apple started doing their PCs. Choice is good - why stick with just one make of PC?

Yes, some people like Apple PCs - some people like Dell, some people like Sony, some people like Samsung, others just buy what fits their particular needs best. As long as we're agreed that they're just another brand of PCs :) What I really don't get is this myth of them "not being PCs", as if this was still back in the days when we had IBM PCs, classic Macintoshes; and that somehow this makes Macs special above all PCs.

I like my Samsung N220 for its small size, long battery life, light weight, decent keyboard, and running a full OS. It has a decent sized hard disk to actually be usable (unlike the Apple Air). I like my custom-built desktop PC because it gives all the power I need, and doesn't cost loads. Apple have nothing that could come anywhere near supplying either of these needs.

Quote
  • cooling system that doesn't melt the laptop if you place the system on a soft surface
Not had this problem on my netbook, it doesn't actually have fan holes on the bottom.

Quote
  • magnetic power connector that prevents disasters (has saved 2 different macbook pros for me already)
Actually, this is a negative for Apple - the reason you won't see this on other laptops is because, believe it or not, they have a patent for "Magnetic connector for electronic device".

Quote
No other "normal" laptop would have survived the beating this one received: busted_macbook_pro.jpg
My cheap Advent took quite a beating. And Thinkpads are reportedly quite robust. But I'm curious why you say "normal" - so there are other laptops that do, after all?

@runequester: What's the point in any brand of PC, when you could just build your own from bits?

The answer is that although enthusiasts and geeks like us do that, most people do not. They happily pay money to have a complete all in one ready made solution. And in particular, even for those of us who are geeks, it doesn't seem trivial to make a custom Commodore 64 or Amiga case, for modern PC hardware...?

It's also not clear to me why someone needs to be writing their own OS for them to be "interesting". Let's face it - whilst Apple do right OS X, it wouldn't be off character for them to dump that technology, and use something else, yet the new machines would still be branded as "Macs", which they'd insist "aren't PCs". Consider how all of the pro-Apple PC comments here have been about the hardware, not OS X - at least one person said how he runs Windows 7 on his Apple PC.

Quote from: cha05e90;630216
When - exactly - Apple sold "Macintoshs" with an vanilla BSD distro, an Apple desktop backdrop and Sheepshaver for running 68k MacOS software?
See above on my comments on why is it so important to write your own custom OS. And they did use emulation to provide backwards compatibility - again, is it better to reinvent the wheel? There are plenty of other areas where Apple have moved from custom hardware to standard 3rd party hardware, in that "Macs" are now straightforward PCs. Why must the OS be custom, but not the hardware?



Quote from: persia;630198
I'm not interested in a computer in a keyboard, it's a silly idea in 2011, but if you come up with an interesting OS, well, that's something different.
I'm not sure it's that silly - there is some market for PCs that are desktops, but don't take up much space. I've seen both "small box" PCs, as well as PCs combined with the monitor. Why not with the keyboard? That means you can choose the monitor separately, whilst still avoiding the need for a separate box.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2011, 02:53:32 AM by mdwh2 »
 

Offline Duce

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Re: CUSA makes the BBC news site
« Reply #95 on: April 09, 2011, 02:39:37 AM »
Apple has the Macbook Air for countering the PC netbook market, and it's a stunning piece of hardware as long as your needs do not exceed what it offers. I own one and run Win7 on it, and I love it.  Comparing a netbook to an iPad is silly, completely different devices to anyone that's used either.  Netbook offers far more functionality, iPad is simply an appliance running a kiosk like OS.
 

Offline mdwh2

Re: CUSA makes the BBC news site
« Reply #96 on: April 09, 2011, 02:46:14 AM »
Quote from: Duce;630348
Apple has the Macbook Air for countering the PC netbook market, and it's a stunning piece of hardware as long as your needs do not exceed what it offers.
It is not in any sense a "netbook". It's way more expensive, and larger (11" are referred to as ultra-portable laptops, netbooks are 10" or below).

It's in the same market as other high end ultra-portable laptops. These other high end laptops are also stunning piece of hardware. I mean, at that price, you'd hope so. I guess I don't see what's so worthy of praise - every other PC company can produce stunning PC hardware if you're willing to pay through the nose, so why not Apple, now that they're just another PC manufacturer? It's not like this is back in the days when they were competing on an entirely different hardware platform. 10 years ago, the question of whether the market might go to the Mac rather than the PC might have been quite interesting - just as we might have liked it to go to the Amiga. But these days, it's just a question of one PC maker versus another.

Having said all this, whilst we have differing views over what PCs we like, it does make the point of what I was originally trying to say: even though Apple just make PCs these days, that doesn't stop them selling them, and indeed, having people get quite enthusiastic over them. These days, people want modern PC hardware, and companies differentiate themselves in other aspects, such as design, cases, services. So I think there's certainly plenty to be said for Commodore's approach, as opposed to the approach of trying to update the original AmigaOS, and doing it on non-x86 hardware. Apple would have died long ago if they stuck with selling PowerPC Macs running a derivative of the classic MacOS.

(The biggest competition for the netbook market is probably the low end ultra-laptop market, since for only slightly more money, people can get something much more powerful, with it only being slightly larger; again Apple have nothing there.)

Quote
I own one and run Win7 on it, and I love it.  Comparing a netbook to an iPad is silly, completely different devices to anyone that's used either.  Netbook offers far more functionality, iPad is simply an appliance running a kiosk like OS.
Well yes, I agree it's silly in that a netbook beats an Ipad hands down. I'm just saying, if you want something smaller than 11", or a cheap mobile computer, Apple have nothing except that.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2011, 03:01:34 AM by mdwh2 »
 

Offline brenry

Re: CUSA makes the BBC news site
« Reply #97 on: April 09, 2011, 04:44:53 AM »
Quote from: mdwh2;630351
even though Apple just make PCs these days, that doesn't stop them selling them, and indeed, having people get quite enthusiastic over them. These days, people want modern PC hardware, and companies differentiate themselves in other aspects, such as design, cases, services.

So I think there's certainly plenty to be said for Commodore's approach

Apple remains in the market because they just don't "sell pc's".. they control the whole architecture with the os and components.  Apple is not in the same ballpark as Hewlette Packard or Compaq that deal in cheap hardware using other people's technology.. which CUSA falls into.
 

Offline runequester

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Re: CUSA makes the BBC news site
« Reply #98 on: April 09, 2011, 06:44:57 AM »
Quote from: brenry;630355
Apple remains in the market because they just don't "sell pc's".. they control the whole architecture with the os and components.  Apple is not in the same ballpark as Hewlette Packard or Compaq that deal in cheap hardware using other people's technology.. which CUSA falls into.

Sort of kind of.
The hardware Apple uses has always been commodity stuff that anyone could have used. They just pick very specific stuff to ship, and make sure the OS supports that, then don't worry about anything else out there.

In PC land, the assumption has always been that the developers make an OS (windows, linux), and the hardware guys make drivers if needed, or make documentation available to the OS can handle it.

PC manufacturers like HP and all those just put parts together and sell a package.

Incidentally, while Im not a huge apple fan, they do benefit from being able to "just work" in most cases.
In PC land, having to try and support every piece of crap out there either means
A: It runs like shit (windows)
B: Its hard as hell to set up (linux)

Nowadays, windows runs pretty well and linux is pretty easy to set up, but its taken a loooong time to get there, and a lot of compatibility was broken along the way.


As an aside, its one of those things where amiga fans will say "Why does the OS take up XXXX gigabytes of hard drive space??" and miss the point. A linux distro aimed at only running on a 68060 and nothing else wouldn't take much more space than amiga OS would. (heck, DSL takes less space than OS 3.9 anyways).
But if you want it to reasonably run on anything you put it on, its gonna bloat. Same for windows.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2011, 06:48:05 AM by runequester »
 

Offline Duce

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Re: CUSA makes the BBC news site
« Reply #99 on: April 09, 2011, 08:04:18 AM »
Curious what sort of support is offered to people that purchase the C-USA 64 pc's when people completely foreign to Linux have issues.  Even the big name makers support Linux horribly, and face it - 90% of computer users these days don't know anything but point and click, *nix command line stuff is an acquired taste.  Asked that ages ago on their forums but the question was deleted, lol.
 

Offline Pyromania

Re: CUSA makes the BBC news site
« Reply #100 on: April 09, 2011, 08:06:38 AM »