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AuthorTopic: 20 Questions with Alan Redhouse  (Read 4519 times)

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Offline Argo

Re: 20 Questions with Alan Redhouse
« Reply #60 on: June 10, 2005, 07:42:23 AM »
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stop making decisions that obviously "defy commercial logic"!

You mean close down the Amiga OS 4.0 project and eat the losses, stop AmigaOne production and any other hardware development, and Amiga, Inc. fold up and go out of business.

I assume you also have a problem with the way Apple conducts its business. Tying Mac OS to only Apple approved hardware.
 

Offline Waccoon

Re: 20 Questions with Alan Redhouse
« Reply #61 on: June 10, 2005, 09:33:57 AM »
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Argo:  I assume you also have a problem with the way Apple conducts its business. Tying Mac OS to only Apple approved hardware.

Apple is far, far more competent at that, and even Macs have a load of problems of their own.  :-)

Any time you have to pay considerably more money for hardware several generations old, you are buying into a hobby market.  It's just disappointing that the AmigaOne is pretty damn generic for a specialty, hobby platform.  It really is just a PC with a non-x86 CPU, and no native support for the old Amiga we know so well.
 

Offline XDelusion

Re: 20 Questions with Alan Redhouse
« Reply #62 on: June 10, 2005, 11:12:14 AM »
"Just a reminder that the classic Amigas are still here folks. They've just been shoved into the corner by the zealots clamoring for something new. Let's take a step back, get our breath, then get back to what matters, and that is enjoying whatever we've got without all the political stupidity.

Wayne"


 I eat every word you say. I don't so much that the Amiga's future will be on Mac hardware, though I would not be surprised to see it appear on IBM.
 None the less. There is an upside to this being the efforts of a hobbyist collective (that has a very smash the church, smash the state kind of ring to it) so far...

..but who's to say it won't pick up? I think the philosophy behind the OS itself is alive now, more than ever. It has been designed to be embedded from day one, and I truely feel that the future will be devices, as opposed to our large boxes. I think the next generation of game consoles should speak as a testament for the future of computing just by there abilities and price tag, which we all know is both HIGH and low.
 They are tiny with microscopic CPU's, built by none other than IBM.
RAM devices are growing in popularity, and are unchallenged in the hard drive market when it comes to speed, only size atm, but things always change, and things come to and end, and new things come into being.
 Resource friendly, as well as a use friendly OS, that has gone un-sung for MANY years, though it has been ripped off, a thoughsand times over in design.
 It has the all to familiar Prefs (control panel), which winblows shares many striking similiarities with. Oh and recall how Microsoft introduced "multi tasking" back in 95, or even Apple for that matter? How about web browsers with pop-up blockers? A simple GUI that runs on a mere 256k RAM if needs be, but in this rapidly growing market, who needs to bother with a mere 256k when we've got Gigs? Gigs of overkill, as the OS does not even nead anything near that, nore do the applications, everything is tiny, needing little from the CPU and Memory, leaving plenty of room for large scale processes that the Amiga was designed for, such as video editing, and audio mixing. Of course there is always room for boring office apps and what not. Only now, unlike M$ Office, they have the option of booting in a millionth of a second, thankx to Amiga's minimalistic philosophy.


And if not, then it continues to be a Hobbyist Collective, and is saved from the corruption of commercialism, capitalism, facism, and all the other fun things that really rule out governments and coporations. I know most Amiga fanatics don't seem to be fond of being spied on, and having tracking devices in there computers and the like.

Anyhow, I'm done ranting, glad I didn't buy an Amiga One.
Earth has a lot of things other folks might want... like the whole planet. And maybe these folks would like a few changes made, like more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and room for their way of life. - William S. Burroughs
 

Offline Seehund

Re: 20 Questions with Alan Redhouse
« Reply #63 on: June 10, 2005, 03:11:16 PM »
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stop making decisions that obviously "defy commercial logic"!

You mean close down the Amiga OS 4.0 project and eat the losses,

I mean make it possible to sell AmigaOS. It is a commercial product that isn't done for free, so it must sell or it's pointless. Might as well open it completely and release the sources then, instead of just sitting on it to let a computer shop sell a few hundred overpriced motherboards. It would be different if it were a hobbyist project made for free in people's spare time.

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stop AmigaOne production and any other hardware development,

If AmigaOS weren't exclusively tethered to the "AmigaOnes", there wouldn't be much cause for concern if they were cancelled today. Get competitive, or good riddance.

Hardware development? There is no hardware development for AmigaOS, at least that much has been done right - anything else would defy commercial logic. (Unless you count fringe phenomena like PPC cards to be used with old Amigas, but that defies commercial logic...)

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and Amiga, Inc. fold up and go out of business.

If that would mean AmigaOS transferred to competent hands, and harmful alliances with irrelevant hardware shops would be broken, yeah, go for it!

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I assume you also have a problem with the way Apple conducts its business. Tying Mac OS to only Apple approved hardware.

Apple sells Macs - their own hardware, their own software. It's Apple's hardware. They have full control over their hardware. They can choose to make new hardware, how to make it, and set their price. They make money on it. I'd wager they make MOST of their money on it. They have the resources, control and competence to try to make their hardware stay competitive. They're in the hardware business.

It's nothing like the situation with AmigaOS4. It's more like the situation back when there were Amigas, and when Commodore had money.
[color=0000FF]Maybe it\\\'s still possible to [/color]save AmigaOS [color=0000FF][/size][/color]  :rtfm:......
 

Offline System

Re: 20 Questions with Alan Redhouse
« Reply #64 on: June 10, 2005, 04:41:10 PM »
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I'd wager they make MOST of their money on it.
Actually?  No.  Apple make far more money on their ancillary products such as the iPod and music service than they do on Macs themselves.  I'm not suggesting Apple make NO profit on the mac, simply not "most of it".
 

Offline Seehund

Re: 20 Questions with Alan Redhouse
« Reply #65 on: June 10, 2005, 06:41:08 PM »
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I'd wager they make MOST of their money on it.


Actually? No. Apple make far more money on their ancillary products such as the iPod and music service than they do on Macs themselves. I'm not suggesting Apple make NO profit on the mac, simply not "most of it".



If I'm reading this table (PDF) right, then my guess was wrong. Apple doesn't make most of its money on Macs, but Macs are still their single largest source of income; 46% of Apple's revenue.

The iPods and iTunes are growing faster than Macs, but they haven't overtaken the Macs just yet. Apple sells a much larger number of iPods than Macs, though.
[color=0000FF]Maybe it\\\'s still possible to [/color]save AmigaOS [color=0000FF][/size][/color]  :rtfm:......
 

Offline System

Re: 20 Questions with Alan Redhouse
« Reply #66 on: June 11, 2005, 02:39:01 PM »
"single largest", yes, but 54% of their income comes  from the ipod, music service and "other".  The sale of OSX Tiger this last few months certainly helped to swing that number.  My point, and I guess we both have a point, is that the iMac is no longer providing the majority of their income.

That being said, I expect the x86 mac to violently sway those figures the other direction on it's introduction next year for at least one or two quarters (depending on price).

The scary thing now is whether mac hardware sales will survive the next few quarters waiting on the x86 mac to arrive.  No one wants to buy a product that Jobs declared both slow, underpowered, and dead-ended.  (Maybe Eyetech and Genesi could have taken the hint there as well).

Wayne