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AuthorTopic: Commodore USA  (Read 11630 times)

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Offline mongo

Re: Commodore USA
« Reply #15 on: September 14, 2010, 03:55:57 PM »
Quote from: BigBenAussie;579267
Just a few corrections.

This is actually further along than he realises, from a professional web design company in Australia. He hasn't been in communication with them like I have, and I am yet to update him on their progress. It's more than web design, but a full e-commerce and CRM solution.


Yes, but will his $19.98 per month CityMax web hosting deal support that?
 

Offline BigBenAussie

Re: Commodore USA
« Reply #16 on: September 14, 2010, 03:56:55 PM »
Quote
These threads must be the job-application process for CUSA, it worked for their CTO.

You have no idea as to what my contribution has been behind the scenes. That is just a cheap shot. Having had, at the time, some knowledge of what was going on, I merely wanted to correct the wild accusations thrown his way.
As for my credentials I am not a random fanboy, although I would certainly not say that I am the most qualified person in the room. I have a comp sci degree and 15 years of software development experience, have worked on large scale projects for fortune 500 companies, led teams, consulted in the US and Europe.
 

Offline BigBenAussie

Re: Commodore USA
« Reply #17 on: September 14, 2010, 03:59:35 PM »
@mongo
Quote

Yes, but will his $19.98 per month CityMax web hosting deal support that?

Forget that Citymax abomination. That web site was started well before the trademarks.
Time to get serious obviously.
 

Offline tone007

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Re: Commodore USA
« Reply #18 on: September 14, 2010, 04:08:43 PM »
Quote from: BigBenAussie;579274
Time to get serious obviously.




                  LET'S GET DANGEROUS.
3 Commodore file cabinets, 2 Commodore USB turntables, 1 AmigaWorld beer mug
Alienware M14x i7 laptop running AmigaForever
 

Offline CSixx

Re: Commodore USA
« Reply #19 on: September 14, 2010, 04:10:41 PM »
Quote from: BigBenAussie;579273
That is just a cheap shot.

A bit of a cheap shot admittedly. But a bit true also :)
 

Offline BigBenAussie

Re: Commodore USA
« Reply #20 on: September 14, 2010, 04:19:30 PM »
@mongo
Quote
Benjamin Altman, Barry's "great (or great great) grandfather" never married and had no children.


Barry asked me to post this in response.

B. Altman and the Fleishmans
When Sophia returned to New York with her children after her husband's murder, her brother Morris led the business that had been founded by their father. In 1872, however, the youngest Altman sibling, Benjamin, established his own “fancy” and dry goods store under the name “B. Altman and Company.” Morris died suddenly at the age of thirty-nine in July 1876, leaving Benjamin to manage the family businesses. At the time of Morris Altman’s death, the Altman brothers were already quite successful merchants and employed over two hundred people. Morris had been a greatly respected businessman and was a prime mover behind the effort toward advocating shorter working hours for dry goods clerks (New York Times, July 14, 1876, p. 4. Henry Hall, ed., America’s Successful Men of Affairs: An Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous Biography, vol. 1 (New York, 1895-96), 16). Morris’ widow died shortly after him and Benjamin assumed responsibility for raising Morris’ four children. Consequently, in addition to operating a large and growing business, Benjamin Altman, thirty-six years old, now had ten fatherless young nieces and nephews in his care. These burdens may very well explain why Benjamin never married and had children of his own.
At his death in 1913, the New York Times estimated Altman to be worth forty-five million in real estate, art holdings and his B. Altman stock (New York Times, October 8, 1913). He donated his celebrated art collection to the Metropolitan Museum Art which was acclaimed at the time as the “most splendid gift that a citizen has ever made to the people of the city of New York” (Metropolitan Museum of Art, Guide to Altman Collection, 13. His collection included, at various times, thirteen major Rembrandts). Altman also became known as a patron of American artists and was commended as a philanthropist who avoided publicizing his charitable works. A biographical note commended Altman for his devotion to the care and education of Morris’ four orphaned children (Hall, America’s Successful Men, 17). Altman remained attached to Judaism and was a member of Temple Emanu-El. After Altman’s death in 1913, Adam Schiff unsuccessfully urged the editors of the Evening Post to mention that Altman “had lived and died as a Jew” (David Levering Lewis, W.E.B. Du Bois - Biography of a Race, 1868-1919 (New York, 1993), 488-9). Altman left his store, B. Altman & Co., in the care of his foundation for the benefit of charitable causes and the employees.
 

Offline mongo

Re: Commodore USA
« Reply #21 on: September 14, 2010, 04:25:21 PM »
Quote from: BigBenAussie;579274
@mongo

Forget that Citymax abomination. That web site was started well before the trademarks.
Time to get serious obviously.


The time to get serious has long since passed.

It's pretty much a total farce by now.
 

Offline BigBenAussie

Re: Commodore USA
« Reply #22 on: September 14, 2010, 04:29:24 PM »
@mongo
Quote

The Commodore Phoenix is, according to it's own manual, an FCC Class A device, meaning that it can only be sold for commercial and industrial use. It can not legally be sold for home use in the USA.

From Barry:

:)
I was producing class A and class B FCC product before he was born.
ALL THE COMPONENTS IN THE PHOENIX, MADE FOR US BY CYBERNET, ARE FROM FCC DoC registered and tested parts. WE ARE IN FULL CONFORMITY FOR BOTH CLASSES.  ALL OTHER PRODUCTS ARE ALL FCC APPROVED, FOR COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL USE!
 

Offline BigBenAussie

Re: Commodore USA
« Reply #23 on: September 14, 2010, 04:32:11 PM »
@CSixx
Quote
A bit of a cheap shot admittedly. But a bit true also
What can I say... Trolls need not apply. ;-)
 

Offline Piru

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Re: Commodore USA
« Reply #24 on: September 14, 2010, 04:36:07 PM »
Quote from: gdanko;579245
You have your opinions on certain subjects and I have mine.
Fine. But who appointed you the MorphOS Team spokesperson and authorized you to talk to this CEO about funding?
Quote
If you don't want to deal with the guy, tell him so.
You contacted him, not us.
Quote
And if you don't want me to express my opinions
You're of course welcome to have your opinions.

However, please don't go talking to random guys about funding MorphOS ports. We'd like to keep that privilege to ourselves.

For the rest: I still think his excuse for the blatant copyright infringement stinks.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2010, 04:40:02 PM by Piru »
 

Offline mongo

Re: Commodore USA
« Reply #25 on: September 14, 2010, 04:48:11 PM »
Quote from: BigBenAussie;579282
@mongo

From Barry:

:)
I was producing class A and class B FCC product before he was born.
ALL THE COMPONENTS IN THE PHOENIX, MADE FOR US BY CYBERNET, ARE FROM FCC DoC registered and tested parts. WE ARE IN FULL CONFORMITY FOR BOTH CLASSES.  ALL OTHER PRODUCTS ARE ALL FCC APPROVED, FOR COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL USE!


Doesn't matter if the parts are tested, the complete system must be tested as a whole.

What's the FCC ID of the Commodore Phoenix, Barry?

And the bonus question : When was I born?
 

Offline gdanko

Re: Commodore USA
« Reply #26 on: September 14, 2010, 04:50:01 PM »
Quote from: mongo;579266
Benjamin Altman, Barry's "great (or great great) grandfather" never married and had no children.


Public knowledge.

B. Altman and the Fleishmans
When Sophia returned to New York with her children after her husband's murder, her brother Morris led the business that had been founded by their father. In 1872, however, the youngest Altman sibling, Benjamin, established his own “fancy” and dry goods store under the name “B. Altman and Company.” Morris died suddenly at the age of thirty-nine in July 1876, leaving Benjamin to manage the family businesses. At the time of Morris Altman’s death, the Altman brothers were already quite successful merchants and employed over two hundred people. Morris had been a greatly respected businessman and was a prime mover behind the effort toward advocating shorter working hours for dry goods clerks (New York Times, July 14, 1876, p. 4. Henry Hall, ed., America’s Successful Men of Affairs: An Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous Biography, vol. 1 (New York, 1895-96), 16). Morris’ widow died shortly after him and Benjamin assumed responsibility for raising Morris’ four children. Consequently, in addition to operating a large and growing business, Benjamin Altman, thirty-six years old, now had ten fatherless young nieces and nephews in his care. These burdens may very well explain why Benjamin never married and had children of his own.
At his death in 1913, the New York Times estimated Altman to be worth forty-five million in real estate, art holdings and his B. Altman stock (New York Times, October 8, 1913). He donated his celebrated art collection to the Metropolitan Museum Art which was acclaimed at the time as the “most splendid gift that a citizen has ever made to the people of the city of New York” (Metropolitan Museum of Art, Guide to Altman Collection, 13. His collection included, at various times, thirteen major Rembrandts). Altman also became known as a patron of American artists and was commended as a philanthropist who avoided publicizing his charitable works. A biographical note commended Altman for his devotion to the care and education of Morris’ four orphaned children (Hall, America’s Successful Men, 17). Altman remained attached to Judaism and was a member of Temple Emanu-El. After Altman’s death in 1913, Adam Schiff unsuccessfully urged the editors of the Evening Post to mention that Altman “had lived and died as a Jew” (David Levering Lewis, W.E.B. Du Bois - Biography of a Race, 1868-1919 (New York, 1993), 488-9). Altman left his store, B. Altman & Co., in the care of his foundation for the benefit of charitable causes and the employees.
 

Offline tone007

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Re: Commodore USA
« Reply #27 on: September 14, 2010, 04:56:46 PM »
^ repost
3 Commodore file cabinets, 2 Commodore USB turntables, 1 AmigaWorld beer mug
Alienware M14x i7 laptop running AmigaForever
 

Offline Akiko

Re: Commodore USA
« Reply #28 on: September 14, 2010, 05:33:23 PM »
Quote from: gdanko;579238
Unlike Bill McEwen, Barry Altman is more than willing to converse with  people and answer their questions. I told him I would keep our conversation completely confidential and he told me, "I wish you wouldn't. Please share anything I tell you because I want people to know the truth.". So here I am. Barry seemed to be frustrated by the herd mentality of the forum communities and quite frankly, I am too. Yeah many of us have had ill dealing with the likes of Doomy but Barry has slighted no one. He's trying to make interesting computers with the Commodore name.


Bill McEwen was also more than willing to converse in the beginning, and we all know how that turned out!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLbwlFVu88M

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9JHMI_r_lM&feature=related
 

Offline BigBenAussie

Re: Commodore USA
« Reply #29 on: September 14, 2010, 06:03:58 PM »
@mongo
Quote
Doesn't matter if the parts are tested, the complete system must be tested as a whole.
FCC reg's have changed.
No need to test complete systems any more.
Only need to have the individual components used be in conformity.

From FCC documentation:
Quote
PROCEDURE
Compliance testing at accredited laboratory.
No testing required for products assembled from authorized modular components.
Label on product (http://www.fcc.gov/oet/dockets/et95-19/labels.html)
Compliance Information Statement in user's manual or separate sheet.

Quote
What's the FCC ID of the Commodore Phoenix, Barry?
The whole point of the new regulations are that no filing is needed, thus there is no FCC ID.
You just need to conform with the declaration of conformity, which goes under the auspices of the component regulations.

Quote
And the bonus question : When was I born?
Ask your mommy. :-p