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AuthorTopic: Space propulsion  (Read 2959 times)

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Offline JaXanim

Re: Space propulsion
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2004, 11:03:48 PM »
@that_punk_guy

That only happens in movies! ;)

JaX
Be inspired! It\\\'s back!
 

Offline Nick

Re: Space propulsion
« Reply #16 on: February 29, 2004, 12:03:39 AM »
All interesting thoughts. I`m not trying to go for the ultimate spacecraft really. I want it to be almost basic, but futuristic at the same time. Functional yet cool too. I`ve made the basic fuselage. Sort of helicopter like, as its an SAR craft. Got most of the design ready to be modelled. I want to get this craft right. Even designed its interior, well roughly.

This animation is going to need many many more craft and other models made. Can`t wait! :-)

Thanks for the ideas.
 

Offline Cymric

Re: Space propulsion
« Reply #17 on: March 01, 2004, 09:34:00 AM »
Quote
JaXanim wrote:
This happens with sub-atomic particles (electrons, etc) right now. Electrons easily move from inner to outer 'orbits' around the atomic nucleus, but they do not 'move' between these orbits. They are either at A or B but never between. They are powered by quantum energy, energy packets of specific size, no more no less. This is gained or lost by the electrons through thermodynamic changes within their parent system.

The way I remember my QM lessons was that they have a certain probability to be anywhere they want, with the biggest values centered on A and B. It isn't that they are 'never in between'---the likelihood of seeing an electron 'in between' is just very, very small.

Quote
In that far, far distant future, I see no reason why the particles which make up our atoms cannot be 'moved' from A to B by applying Terajoules of quantum energy in some form of 'Brundle cage'.

Quantum decoherence of macroscopic systems is most likely going to prevent that. And I don't think a terajoule would be suffiencent :-). In any case, if you want a nice story where the above principle is applied---although the quality of the tale drops off in the final part---read Dan Symmons' 'Hyperion' saga.
Some people say that cats are sneaky, evil and cruel. True, and they have many other fine qualities as well.
 

Offline asian1

Re: Space propulsion
« Reply #18 on: March 01, 2004, 05:17:27 PM »
Hi
What about blimp/dirigible/"lighter than air" aircraft?
There is a research about laser driven engine, but you should put a giant laser generator on the ground.
 

Offline KennyR

Re: Space propulsion
« Reply #19 on: March 01, 2004, 06:36:01 PM »
Quote
Cymric wrote:
The way I remember my QM lessons was that they have a certain probability to be anywhere they want, with the biggest values centered on A and B. It isn't that they are 'never in between'---the likelihood of seeing an electron 'in between' is just very, very small.


That's how electron clouds work, but that doesn't define the orbitals. The actual orbitals have discrete energy levels where an electron just seems to pop out of existence and back in again at a different level. They don't exist inbetween for real, not even quadrillionths of a quadrillionth of an instant. This is what being a quanta is all about.

Quote
Quantum decoherence of macroscopic systems is most likely going to prevent that.


Yep, decoherence kills all quantum effects stone dead. The only way to get most quantum effects working is at several thousands of a degree near absolute zero on the picometer scale. Not useful for a spacecraft.
 

Offline JaXanim

Re: Space propulsion
« Reply #20 on: March 01, 2004, 08:16:03 PM »
I had a feeling Brundle was flawed. Think I'll just shelve the whole thing.{-(

Cheers,

JaX
Be inspired! It\\\'s back!
 

Offline Nick

Re: Space propulsion
« Reply #21 on: March 01, 2004, 08:23:25 PM »
@asian1

Lighter than air wouldn`t look so cool, unless is was cunningly shaped out of polystyrene and had a hollow core filled with Helium :-D

I forgot about those laser engines. I saw a program about those a while ago. Quite restricting really. And they don`t produce cool looking flames. I`m not going for the Startrek look. Thrusters all over the place.

I`ve just about created the basic, functioning exterior. Can`t wait to complete this animation, so i can show it off :-)
 

Offline mikeymike

Re: Space propulsion
« Reply #22 on: March 01, 2004, 08:25:17 PM »
Just be sure to use an Amiga for its onboard computer system :-P

Offline JaXanim

Re: Space propulsion
« Reply #23 on: March 01, 2004, 09:15:17 PM »
@mikeymike

Yes indeed!

And in case anyone here hasn't seen why (well there MUST be someone who hasn't seen it!) I suggest you pop over to THIS SITE for some serious educational stuff!

Cheers,

JaX

Be inspired! It\\\'s back!
 

Offline QuikSanz

Re: Space propulsion
« Reply #24 on: March 04, 2004, 11:38:27 PM »
@ KennyR

Qoute
no, I mean movement by using a phased and vectored, artificially generated gravitational field. You just fall in whatever direction you like,

You just described warp drive EXACTLY.

Chris