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AuthorTopic: Programming environment  (Read 487 times)

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Offline iCreate

Programming environment
« on: June 28, 2020, 08:22:39 PM »
Anyone here using emulation in order to mess around with code for classic Amigas?
What pros and cons have you come across?
 

Online TribbleSmasher

Re: Programming environment
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2020, 08:35:19 PM »
Yes!
Pros:
HighRes WinUAE RTG screen
Lightning fast
Reboots in a few seconds if something fails
Easy screenshots
Cons:
Still the old tools, editors, compilers*


I am not really a fan of VSCode and Notepad++ extensions for doing Amiga coding as it seems wrong somehow. But i dig emulating a 400MHz A4000 and doing it OldStyle that way.  8) ;D
*exceptions apply
 

Offline pjhutch

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Re: Programming environment
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2020, 12:51:41 PM »
For coding writing, try Cygnus Ed, Gold Ed or Storm C Ed editors.
Notepad for AmigaOS 4 also pretty code.

For languages use GCC from the Amiga OS 4 SDK or VBCC for latest C compiler for older AmigaOS computers.
 

Offline Joloo

Re: Programming environment
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2020, 09:04:58 PM »
I am with TribbleSmasher.
Already in 1995 I ran out of resources for my Amiga programs, due to the available RAM (just 18 MB) and the time it took compiling/assembling more complex source codes. Some time later, I decided to left the Amiga platform and use *NIX/Windows instead. My machines (A4000, A2000 and A500) then have been barred in the basement and have got never been turned on again.
I don't know when I did stumble over WinUAE and Amithlon, but those two were so appealing to me that I played with them for a while until I suddenly saw myself again writing software for AmigaOS3.
Since that day I am using emulation environments for classic Amiga programming and for using OS application programs - and I am happy with it.
Today, a lot of coders developing Amiga/MorphOS/AROS related software by using an up-to-date operating system. I don't need that for classic Amiga programming (besides hosting WinUAE...) for the simple reason that I still hang on AmigaOS3, and, WinUAE is close to be perfect (unfortunately, each new WinUAE version requires a slightly different keymap, but that's the sole negative I can say about WinUAE), hence I'm using this emulation environment for AmigaOS 1.x, 3.x. I don't need a real machine anymore, although debugging on real machines was back then easier as I had connected two Amigas and could study the result of that machine when it did crash.