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AuthorTopic: Distributed file engine to replace (augment) Aminet  (Read 1132 times)

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Distributed file engine to replace (augment) Aminet
« on: November 19, 2004, 08:18:13 PM »
One of the things I think that made the Amiga a success was the prevalence of shareware software.  For YEARS, Aminet has been the soul of the Amiga shareware effort and by posting this, I do not in any way mean to criticize or lessen the effort made by the people behind it.

I also know that the Amiga is relatively far behind the times, both technologically and in basic mindset of the remaining users.  One thing that's always bothered me though is the fact that, even with a web interface, the Aminet is still primarily based on antiquated FTP methodology.  A methodology that I'm sure many of you who use PC's find as inconvenient and/or annoying as I do.

What I would like to see for the Amiga community is a "Distributed File Engine" similar to download.com which makes files available world-wide and even allows for mirrors around the globe to share the load.

If someone had the time or was looking for a project, this would be (IMnsHO) a great one.

Wayne
 

Offline legion

Re: Distributed file engine to replace (augment) Aminet
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2004, 09:55:37 PM »
Any idea what the total file size is?
Have you hugged your KennyR or Paul Gadd today?
 

Offline CatHerder

Re: Distributed file engine to replace (augment) Aminet
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2004, 10:39:06 PM »
Aminet is about 27GB. Source
[color=000099]CatHerder[/color][/i]
Go Graphical Website Design is what I do.
My eBay World <- Amiga swag, if any.
 

Offline Trev

Re: Distributed file engine to replace (augment) Aminet
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2004, 10:48:51 PM »
I love Aminet's interface (the old one--not the "new" one on the master server), and I think sites like Download.com are bloated and steaming piles of you know what. :-) Seriously, there are two major file transfer protocols in use today, not counting NFS, CIFS, and proprietary P2P protocols): FTP and HTTP. The only difference between Download.com and Aminet is the flashy interface. The back end processes are basically the same.

Aminet could benefit from a slightly better indexing and search system, but the interface should remain simple. Modifying directory indexes and search results to link to the closest mirror shouldn't require a huge effort. . . .

Trev