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AuthorTopic: Is the A2200 machine a hoax?  (Read 3083 times)

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Offline Lando

Re: Is the A2200 machine a hoax?
« Reply #15 on: February 03, 2006, 06:02:32 AM »
Quote

Legerdemain wrote:

I think things would have evolved in an entirely different direction. Not that I do believe that the Amiga would have conquered the world, but I do think that it would have finally been looked upon as a "serious" computer and a serious competitor against the Mac and the PC (which it, in general, really never was looked upon as).


I certainly agree that if Amigas with AAA had been available in 90/91, and if Commodore had maintained development - releasing newer upgraded machines every year or two - then Commodore would still be here and Amigas would be hovering up there in second or third place behind Windows and Mac.

In an alternate reality, we could all be discussing the new 'AmigaPro Duo' laptops and comparing benchmarks with the 'old' PowerAmiga G5's we've been using for the last couple of years.
 

Offline JLF65

Re: Is the A2200 machine a hoax?
« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2006, 06:48:38 AM »
Quote

DamageX wrote:
Then the sprite capabilities of an A500 are well below what the PC-Engine or Megadrive could do.


That's not true. The sprites on the Amiga were SLIGHTLY more restricted on a single horizontal line (max of 8 unless you reused a channel), but they were far more flexible, especially since they could extended the entire height of the display. Add the blitter on top as well as real bitmapped graphics (the SEGA had no bitmapped graphics at all) and the OCS/ECS was more than a match for any of the game systems out. Remember that the Amiga was originally designed to be a game system to compete against the SEGA Genesis (Megadrive) and SNES. CBM bought it to replace the ST which Jack took with him to Atari.
 

Offline Matt_H

Re: Is the A2200 machine a hoax?
« Reply #17 on: February 03, 2006, 03:21:01 PM »
The Amiga couldn't have been designed to compete against the Megadrive and SNES since they didn't exist yet. In the US, the Megadrive came out in 1989 and the SNES I think in 1991.

So it's okay if they beat the Amiga in some respects. They're newer.

It's sad that the Megadrive versions of many Amiga games tend to be better technically. Although I'd chalk that up to programmers doing a straight port rather than taking advantage of the Amiga's copper and blitter. The Amiga versions could have been as good, or better.

The same thing happened with the Saturn and Playstation. Saturn versions of many PSX games were straight-through, barely operational ports, whereas 'native' Saturn games pulled some absolutely amazing tricks out of the (arguably superior but much harder to program) hardware.
 

Offline CatHerder

Re: Is the A2200 machine a hoax?
« Reply #18 on: February 03, 2006, 06:19:04 PM »
Commodore Germany may have had an internal marketing idea called an A2200 but there was never a Commodore engineered A2200 or Amiga 2200.

The reason the A2200 was called an A2200 (as advertised by Computer Answers (AMITech)in Amiga World and Amazing Amiga) and not an Amiga 2200 was entirely because it was not a Commodore product. Naming it "A2200" did not break any copyright laws. This was confirmed and encouraged by Commodore Canada at the time: they saw the A2200 as a saving grace for their market -- there were over 100,000 CD32's in the pre-distribution channel including unassembled Spellbound motherboards. The additional $1.5-$2 million in sales to CA/AMITech (who, at the time were already >60% of Commodore Canada's sales channel) was viewed along the lines of "we all will have jobs at Commodore Canada for another year" (Commodore Canada never had a year in the red, even when C=USA went bankrupt Commodore Canada was still making money).

As somebody else noted, Spellbound is the name of the CD32 motherboard (I hoped somebody would pick up on that). The A2200 was designed entirely around the Spellbound motherboard, and thus it has the AGA chipset (the Akiko varient and the single "3.1" ROM).

The Agent-88 board was designed to attach directly to the expansion port of the Spellbound (there were also a couple other physical post-factory changes made to the Spellbound, but it didn't include chip changes). The Agent88 literally turned the Spellbound motherboard into a new motherboard that was 1.75 times as wide, it attached and then both boards were mounted as one single motherboard in the case. (The Agent-88 was similar in regards to an SX-32 or an SX-1 but with additional expansion capabilities including an accelerator slot, optional scsi module, etc. The big difference was it wasn't a CD32 game console expansion product, it was an actual new "Amiga clone" inside a real desktop case with the ability to expand it -- it would have been considered an AGA 3000 with CDROM market-wise).

The brilliance behind the A2200 was in its focus on a segment of the Commodore inventory that had the only available Amiga product supply channel that wasn't, as far as Commodore Canada knew, threatened by the bankruptcy of Commodore USA. While all other Amiga product lines had already been halted due to bankruptcy and frozen assets by creditors, the Spellbound (CD32) motherboard had upwards of 100,000 units sitting complete in a warehouse -- a warehouse that was not yet frozen by any creditor. Sadly, when Commodore filed for complete chapter 7 in Bahamian courts this last remaining invetory became lost.

The Spellbound (CD32) motherboards were built in one factory and then shipped to an assembly plant where the cases and other parts (shields, cd drives, controllers, packaging etc) were finally assembled into a CD32. From what I understand, the company that held the motherboards eventually recycled them for scrap (copper & other rare earth elements, etc). The vast majority of those motherboards could have ended up inside A2200 units, but like everything else the Commodore curse prevailed.

[color=000099]CatHerder[/color][/i]
Go Graphical Website Design is what I do.
My eBay World <- Amiga swag, if any.
 

Offline Legerdemain

Re: Is the A2200 machine a hoax?
« Reply #19 on: February 03, 2006, 06:39:08 PM »
The same thing happened with the Saturn and Playstation. Saturn versions of many PSX games were straight-through, barely operational ports, whereas 'native' Saturn games pulled some absolutely amazing tricks out of the (arguably superior but much harder to program) hardware.
Quote


Well, considering that games like Burning Rangers for the Saturn even found a way to use the sound CPU to render transparencies, its pretty safe to say much could have been done if the system had been explored a bit past its, way too early, bitter end. Just look at Radiant Silvergun, now that is magic (even though it still would have been very doable on a PSX).

The main problem was with the support CPU's as far as I've heard (in a way a bit like the new PS3 is designed). The programmers didn't really know how to make the code make use of them in an efficient way, and thus the code often fell back on executing most instructions on the main CPU. Just like all the worthless Atari ST ports appearing on the Amiga early on which didn't make use of the Amigas native chipsets (oooooh, holy hell, do I miss smooth scrolling on many many many many Amiga games, even games that were coded directly for the Amiga). Oh well.

But... since I have absolutely no clue what I am talking about here I will not say more.
Amiga 1200, Mirage Tower, PC-Key 1200, Blizzard 1260/50, SCSI Kit, 256MB RAM, 40GB HD, Mediator SX, Soundblaster 128, Voodoo 3 and Realtek 8139.
 

Offline gdanko

Re: Is the A2200 machine a hoax?
« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2006, 06:59:40 PM »
Was it military grade hardware? ;)
 

Offline CD32Freak

Re: Is the A2200 machine a hoax?
« Reply #21 on: November 08, 2019, 09:55:08 AM »
So reading this topic after 13 years, I wonder if we will ever see pictures of the A2200 :-)
 

Offline Matt_H

Re: Is the A2200 machine a hoax?
« Reply #22 on: November 08, 2019, 02:57:22 PM »
It was shown at the Amiga 30 event in 2015 in California, or, at least, the motherboard was. For some reason I didn’t snap a picture of it, but it looked similar to an A3000 motherboard with yellow silkscreening.
 

Offline psxphill

Re: Is the A2200 machine a hoax?
« Reply #23 on: November 08, 2019, 09:10:45 PM »
It was shown at the Amiga 30 event in 2015 in California, or, at least, the motherboard was. For some reason I didn’t snap a picture of it, but it looked similar to an A3000 motherboard with yellow silkscreening.

Was it this one?

https://www.bigbookofamigahardware.com/bboah/product.aspx?id=2015
https://www.facebook.com/AEonTechnologyLtd/posts/rare-amiga-a2200-prototype-listed-for-sale-on-ebayhttpwwwebaycomitmcommodore-ami/1065089730168078/

I can't find anything about the other A2200, but it reminds me of the Index Information systems

https://www.bigbookofamigahardware.com/bboah/product.aspx?id=39
https://www.bigbookofamigahardware.com/bboah/product.aspx?id=40
 

Offline Matt_H

Re: Is the A2200 machine a hoax?
« Reply #24 on: November 08, 2019, 09:22:10 PM »
It was shown at the Amiga 30 event in 2015 in California, or, at least, the motherboard was. For some reason I didn’t snap a picture of it, but it looked similar to an A3000 motherboard with yellow silkscreening.

Was it this one?

https://www.bigbookofamigahardware.com/bboah/product.aspx?id=2015
https://www.facebook.com/AEonTechnologyLtd/posts/rare-amiga-a2200-prototype-listed-for-sale-on-ebayhttpwwwebaycomitmcommodore-ami/1065089730168078/

Yup. Not sure if it was that exact unit, but that’s the model that was shown.


Quote
I can't find anything about the other A2200, but it reminds me of the Index Information systems

https://www.bigbookofamigahardware.com/bboah/product.aspx?id=39
https://www.bigbookofamigahardware.com/bboah/product.aspx?id=40

You mean the one that was supposedly based around a CD32 motherboard?
https://www.bigbookofamigahardware.com/bboah/product.aspx?id=19
I believe that one remains unseen.
 

Offline Amiga_Nut

Re: Is the A2200 machine a hoax?
« Reply #25 on: November 09, 2019, 11:40:21 PM »
I seem to remember Commodore Canada exclusively (?) had a machine on sale/ready to go on sale which was a lot like a little brother to the A4000/030 and that possibly used the CD32 motherboard with AKIKO but it would have had an Atari Mega/Acorn or A3000 style slimmer pizza box style slim case not the A4000 look-a-like mentioned on the [non functioning] link above. It may have had a 14mhz 020 not 28mhz too. If I ever remember the name of it I will be glad to see it again.
 

Offline Dynamic_Computing

Re: Is the A2200 machine a hoax?
« Reply #26 on: November 10, 2019, 06:50:53 AM »
Wow.. serious Thread Necromancy here! But it caught my eye because I own an A2200 motherboard. Check it out here!
https://youtu.be/6UO8qxPBb8o